Before plastic bags there were paper bags. Before paper bags there were…baskets! Martha May will take you step by step through the simple process of making your own general purpose market basket.

Buy HD Download $10
Free for Members

Product Description

Before plastic bags there were paper bags. Before paper bags there were…baskets! Martha May will take you step by step through the simple process of making your own general purpose market basket.

Eric S. Alexander, AR
Hello! Our family enjoyed watching this instructional video. The quality videography made it easy to follow and the teacher's knowledge, skill, and instruction were clear. Thank you! We had one question, however, regarding the use of pine needles as the instructor mentions toward the beginning of the video. How can pine needles be used for basket making? We live in southern Argentina (Patagonia) and are likely not able to find and purchase ready made materials so we would need to research how to locate and use materials we can find in the wild. Thank you!
October 19, 2014 18:55
Martha M. ,
While I use pine needles because they are plentiful here, you can also use dried grass, corn shucks, or long slender leaves instead of the pine needles to make coiled baskets. In the U.S. we have some trees that the wood can be split and used in the same way the rattan reed is used in the video. I am not familiar with what grows in Argentina, but would be happy to talk with you more about what you do have that will work for basket making. If you have palm trees, the leaves can be used for plaited baskets. There are many vines, plants, grasses and trees that can be used for different kinds of baskets.

One way of finding out whether a vine or plant will work is: if it is flexible enough to be bent around your wrist it can be used for a spoke, and if it can be bent around your finger it can be used for a weaver.

I make coiled baskets from pine needles. Pine Needle baskets are made by starting the center with either pine needles themselves or a base that is made from wood, pottery, leather or many other things. Once you start the pine needles the whole basket is one continuous coil. Every few stitches you add more pine needles to the end of the coil, then continue to stitch. I like to stitch them with waxed linen thread, but raffia or other kinds of long leaves, yarns or threads can be used to stitch with as well.

I will send you a few pictures of pine needle baskets to give you a general idea of the ones I make.

Martha May
October 24, 2014 15:06