The dado joint is an important joint that is commonly used in bookshelves, cabinets, dressers and more. Frank shows you how to lay out the joint and how to cut it so that your dado fits tightly. You will also learn important techniques, such as the knife-wall technique and using a marking gauge, that you will use over and over in your woodworking.


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Product Description

The dado joint is an important joint that is commonly used in bookshelves, cabinets, dressers and more. Frank shows you how to lay out the joint and how to cut it so that your dado fits tightly. You will also learn important techniques, such as the knife-wall technique and using a marking gauge, that you will use over and over in your woodworking.

Larry H. Corsicana, TX
Do you recommend an open or closed face dado plane?
July 15, 2014 16:27
Frank S. Waco, TX
HI Larry, I am using an open face router plane but the closed could come in handy if you were working on the end of a board and you needed additional support at the end. If you are removing a lot of material as I often do, I think the open face is better, less likely for chips to get caught in the mouth. Again I have the open face so that's what I have always used. If you are not planning on removing a lot of material then you could easily go with the closed mouth. I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have any other questions. Frank
July 17, 2014 12:07
Jay E O. Hitchcock, TX
I am a beginner with hands tools. For someone who does woodworking as a hobby, should I get a large router plane or the small router plane? Does the open or closed mouth make a difference with a small router?
July 31, 2014 06:38
Frank S. Waco, TX
It depends what size dados you are going to be cutting. I think the larger one might be a better fit for all around use. So far as the open versus closed mouth, I have always used the open mouth. Its one of those problems, they started coming out with all these fancy tools after I have been using the "old" ones for years! I think the closed mouth is great if you are working on the end of a board, because it offers support all the way at the end. However the open mouth is nice because it keeps shavings from getting clogged in the mouth, especially if you are taking a bunch of stock out. It seems like the closed mouth large router plane might be a good fit for you, but either way you won't go wrong.
I hope this helps please let me know if you have any other questions.
Frank
July 31, 2014 17:34
Randall D. Dallas, TX
Frank-any reason not to use a crosscut saw to cut the dado wall instead of the chisel and mallet once the knife method has established a small wall? For me it seems like the more steps I have to take and tools I use the great the possibility for me to make a mistake.
August 24, 2014 14:40
Frank S. Waco, TX
Hi RD, There is no reason at all not to use the saw to cut the walls. In fact when I have a really long dado like on a case side, I will use the saw. One situation where you might not, is in the shelf that we do, that is the next project coming out. We do stop dados, which make it harder to cut using the saw. The other problem is a lot of folks find the saw hard to use, its one of the more challenging skills to obtain. But go for it, try both ways and see what you think. Let us know how you make out.
August 27, 2014 21:33
GREGG W. bruceville, TX
Frank have you mentioned a place to buy tools - I am sure I am like most people. I want quality but a at a good price. I have actually found a few at Garage sales. In response to Randall D's question about using a crosscut saw to cut the dado walls - and I may be mistaken about this since I was pretty young at the time - My granddad made a jig that held his saw blade at a perfect 90 degree angle. All it was (I think) was a 1x2 that laid flat that had a 1x4 connected at a right angle. He had one on both sides connected to each other at the ends and he could clamp it down. You had a straight cut that was square.
October 10, 2014 22:50
Frank S. Waco, TX
Hello Mr. Wetterman, I look for tools in many places. Garage sales, antique stores, Craigslist and Ebay too. There are a few organizations that hold tool meets from time to time. The Midwest tool collectors Assc. is a good website to check out. There is a fellow in the Dallas area that has a tool meet from time to time, Lynn Dowd's Tools. Of course I recommend buying the best you can afford and if you can buy from Lie-Nielsen or Lee- Valley tools you really won't go wrong. You don't want to struggle with a cheaply made tool. That is a good tip for crosscutting the dado, I have done a similar thing and it works well. Let me know if there is anything else I can help with. Frank
October 29, 2014 07:47